7th Annual AARS Scientific Symposium

The AARS holds its Annual Scientific Symposium at the Society for Investigative Dermatology (SID) annual meeting. Our 7th Annual AARS Scientific Luncheon Symposium was held in Orlando, Florida on Wednesday, May 16, 2018.

The AARS has made available the majority of the talks from the symposium and they are found in the links below.


Antimicrobial Activity of Cytolytic Th17 Cells Targeting Propionibacterium Acnes

Presenter: George Agak, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Distinct C. Acnes Strains Isolated from Lesional and Non-Lesional Regions of Acne Promote Differential Immune Responses

Presenter: Alan O’Neill, PhD, University of California, San Diego, Department of Medicine, Dermatology, San Diego, CA, USA


Lysis by Bacteriophage Can Modulate C. acnes-Induced Immune Responses

Presenter: Laura Marinelli, MD, UCLA Department of Medicine, Dermatology, Los Angeles, CA, USA

An In Vivo Model for Post-Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation

Presenter: Taylor Braunberger, MD, Dermatology Clinical Research Fellow, Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital Systems, Detroit, MI, USA


P. acnes Carbohydrates from Acne-Associated Phylotypes Induce Distinct Inflammatory Response in Comparison to Carbohydrates from Healthy Phylotypes: A Potential Ligand Implicated in Acne Disease Pathogenesis

Presenter: Evyatar Evron, MD, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA


Symposium Agenda

1:00

Antimicrobial Activity of Cytolytic Th17 Cells Targeting Propionibacterium acnes, George Agak, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA

1:20

Distinct C. acnes Strains Isolated from Lesional and Non-Lesional Regions of Acne Promote Differential Immune Responses, Alan O’Neill, PhD, University of California, San Diego, Department of Medicine, Dermatology, San Diego, CA, USA

1:40

The Acne Microbiome Response to Isotretinoin Therapy, William H. McCoy, IV, MD, PhD, Research Instructor in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA

2:00

Lysis by Bacteriophage Can Modulate C. acnes-Induced Immune Responses, Laura Marinelli, MD, UCLA Department of Medicine, Dermatology, Los Angeles, CA, USA

2:20

An In Vivo Model for Post-Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation, Taylor Braunberger, MD, Dermatology Clinical Research Fellow, Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital Systems, Detroit, MI, USA

2:40

P. acnes Carbohydrates from Acne-Associated Phylotypes Induce Distinct Inflammatory Response in Comparison to Carbohydrates from Healthy Phylotypes: A Potential Ligand Implicated in Acne Disease Pathogenesis, Evyatar Evron, MD, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA

3:00

Altered Metabolism of Elastic Fibers and Collagen Fibers Derived from TGF-β1 Mediated Inflammation in Atrophic Acne Scarring, Dae Hun Suh, MD, PhD, Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

3:20

Both Lesional and Non-Lesional Skin from Acne Patients Shows Robust IL-17 Skewing and Upregulation of Antimicrobial Peptides, Teresa Song, BS, Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA

3:40

Demodex Mites Modulate Skin Inflammation: Potential Role in Rosacea, Solene Gatault, PhD, PharmD, Charles Institute of Dermatology, University College of Dublin, Belfied, Dublin, Ireland